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Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong
Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong, close-up
Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong, close-up

Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong
thong sculpture 2005

"'Cos I'm strong enough/To live without you/Strong enough and I quit crying Long enough now I'm strong enough/To know you gotta go." Cher from Strong Enough

Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong is a tribute to the artist who continues, after four decades in the spotlight, to empower women through her music. A living testament to her music, she drives home the fact that sensuality and strength can coexist. The door to the world is opened wide once we have gained a strong sense of self-worth and self-love.

In an interview during her Farewell Tour 2004, Cher discloses that "Strong Enough" is one of her most cherished songs of her repertoire, and the costume she enjoys most is [the black thong bodysuit] from "If I Could Turn Back Time." Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong displays around a tube form of clear Plexiglas, mounted on the wall with an illustration of Cher in the full costume, as if they were artifacts from one of her performances.

in the red: fashion*craft*art
in the red: fashion*craft*art, close-up

in the red: fashion*craft*art
craft tiara 2006

As designers, our work is often pigeonholed into one of three categories: fashion, craft, or art. Rare to find the example of work that is accepted into all three realms, even though the boundaries between the three are becoming blurred. Who determines the criteria, sets the standards for these titles—Museums, Consumers, Artists, or more likely, the Marketplace? In truth, design blends across multiple realms. Do not most craftspeople consider their work an art? Is not art often seen as "in fashion", and cannot fashion be regarded as a "craft"?

truth 1Truth1: Infotainment

Truth1: Infotainment
from the Truth series, neckpiece and frame 2002

"Today [‘s media] it’s not about the quest for Truth, it’s about Entertainment."
                                John Nichols, Washington DC correspondent

It’s up to each one of us to gather the grey, the missing Truth,
from amongst the black and white fragmented "facts".

Truth 2: The Past
Truth 2: The Past, close-up
Truth 2: The Past, close-up

Truth 2: The Past
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

The Statue of Liberty is globally recognized as a symbol of Freedom and as an aspired American Ideal. However, the government has interpreted "with Liberty and Justice for all" as is sees fit to serve its agenda.

During WWII President Roosevelt ordered for the evacuation of all persons of Japanese ancestry, including Japanese American citizens, to be put into concentration camps. For four years, over 120,000 people were forced to live under harsh conditions with little contact from the outside.

Currently we are seeing these same war hysteria patterns arise, but towards people of Arab and Muslim descent. Who will be the next target? In a climate of international war how does the symbol of Miss Liberty take on new meaning, and how are the boundaries of liberty and freedom blurred? Is truth accessible within today’s corporate plutocracy?

Truth 2: The Present
Truth 2: The Present, close-up

Truth2: The Present
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

The Statue of Liberty is globally recognized as a symbol of Freedom and as an aspired American Ideal. However, the government has interpreted "with Liberty and Justice for all" as is sees fit to serve its agenda.

Unnecessary suffering versus military necessity. There is no agreed definition of unnecessary suffering. Whether a weapon causes unnecessary suffering turns on whether the injury, including death, to combatants is disproportionate to the military advantage gained by use of the weapon. The effect of a weapon must be weighed in light of levels of injury to enemy combatants by comparable, lawful weapons in use on the modern battlefield. The critical factor is whether the suffering is needless or disproportionate to the military advantage secured by the weapon, not the degree of suffering itself. The MOAB weapon kills by way of blast or fragmentation. Blast and fragmentation are historic and common anti-personnel effects in lawful military weapons. There are no components that would cause unnecessary suffering. The explosive ingredient H6 is a widely-used explosive that is typical for weapons of this type. The components RDX and TNT do have some potential toxic effects from long-term exposure, but these are limited and within US government tolerance levels. The potential psychological effect of the weapon does not constitute suffering. The intent is to demoralize or frighten the enemy by impressing them with the large footprint, resulting cloud, and tremendous noise of the explosion.

Excerpt from MEMORANDUM FOR AAC/JAQ (Mr. Luthy), 3/21/03, DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE Headquarters; SUBJECT: Requested Legal Review of the Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB) Weapon

Truth3: Mediacracy—Sold! To the Highest Bidder!
Truth3: Mediacracy—Sold! To the Highest Bidder!, close-up

Truth3: Mediacracy—Sold! To the Highest Bidder!
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

"Any relaxation of ownership restrictions will further denigrate the quality and diversity of information received by the public and will have grave consequences for the fee and open debate necessary to sustain a democratic society." Linda Foley, President of The Newspaper Guild—Communications Workers of America

A total of six multinational corporations own and control 80% of the Media around the world. It is their viewpoint that we see and hear daily on TV, in print, and radio. Because of the power these corporations wield it is almost impossible for alternative media to compete monetarily. As a result, alternative viewpoints are being suffocated, and may ultimately be wiped out.

June 2, 2003 the Federal Communications Commission voted to abolish the last of the media-ownership limits. These rules—intended to protect diversity of viewpoints, competition and local ownership—keep major TV networks from merging into one and prevent a single company from dominating the local TV market or owning a cross-platform of local media markets. FCC's Chairman Powell (former board member of AOL and son of Colin Powell, Secretary of State) claims "media mergers are good for business." Since when has it been the FCC's job to protect business interests over public interests?

By September 16, 2003, thanks to the hundreds of thousands of citizens who spoke out against the FCC's ruling, both the Senate and House voted resoundingly in favor of reversing the FCC's ruling. And by using the Congressional Review Act, Congress passed a resolution in a 55-40 vote to roll back the FCC rules.

President Bush vows to veto this resolution when it passes his desk. Is it any coincidence that the media industry has spent $124 million on political contributions and lobbying in Washington, DC since 1995?

Will you hear about this on the nightly news? Does the Bush Administration believe our voices matter?

Truth4: The Past is Present—Violations of the IV
Truth4: The Past is Present—Violations of the IV, close-up

Truth4: The Past is Present—Violations of the IV
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

"May it serve as a constant reminder of our past so that Americans in the future will never again be denied their constitutional rights and may the remembrance of that experience serve to advance the evolution of the human spirit." Plaque at the Poston Relocation Center

During WWII from the spring of 1942 through the spring of 1946, over 120,000 individuals of Japanese ancestry, the majority of them American citizens were forced to live in "relocation camps", tar paper barracks thrown up in the middle of the barren lands. War hysteria had overtaken the country and Japanese Americans were the targets of extreme racial discrimination, losing their lands, homes, and businesses, not welcomed to return after the war.

Ironically, during the entire course of the war, only 10 people were convicted of spying for Japan, none of which were of Japanese descent.

Their Constitutional rights guarding against unreasonable search and seizure were violated. And it is happening again, this time against individuals of Arab descent. The Bush Administration has deemed it lawful through the Patriot Act to arrest whomever they please, without reason for an infinite amount of time. No one is given access, not even families, not even lawyers.

Is this what our Statue of Liberty, the international icon of "freedom and justice for all" stands for in today's democracy?

in the red Bay: the Artsin the red Bay: the Arts

in the red Bay: the Arts
neckpiece 2001

"The technological boom is forcing cutting edge art groups out [of San Francisco]...is losing it's heart and soul."

"San Francisco is not artist-friendly anymore, it's too expensive and it's difficult to make art when your scrambling to make ends meet." San Francisco Chronicle, "No Room For the Arts", Oct 18, 2000

This "dynamite" neckpiece was created at the height of the dot com boom and incorporates quotes from dozens of art groups and how they and the city were affected. It stands as a testament, a time-capsule of that brief moment in our history.

Quotes imbedded into neckpiece:
MORATORIUM          MASS EVICTION          RAPID FIRE PACE          BOOM FORCING ART OUT
EXPLODING GENTRIFICATION
Losing Heart & Soul     erosion of diverse heritage     appendage to fine dining     Artistic Health at Risk     400% Rent Increase     Rents will TRIPLE     UNDERSIEGE     TIME RUNNING OUT     Starbucks Entertainment     911 RENT     2000 Musicians DISPLACED     Rent to the Highest Bidder     pulse growing fainter     $55 PER SQ. FT.     500 Bands EVICTED     85 Arts Groups AT RISK     SOLD!     MonoCulture Estates     EVERYONE MUST GO!     THIS  CRISIS  IS  REAL     space culture     so much apathy     losing grassroots     the City blew it     We're your Embassadors     they won't come back     you need us     greedy landlords     fucked situation     Money for Money's sake     faceless new economy     organizations threatened     intangible life needs     clear cutting of culture     What does SF value?     What do you value?     need space to create     no time for art     Money without Class     times are good for who?     fabric of the City will change     TAKE  BACK  SAN FRANCISCO!

"with these words I thee…""with these words I thee…", close-up

"with these words I thee…"
bridal veil and tiara on platform 2001

"To plan a decent wedding you need at least 20K… can't wait for it to be over."

Weddings are Big Business. "Properly" done, it can create a year of stress and a mortgage-size debt. Bridal Marketing inundates and convinces us that we need so much to make our day picture-perfect. And our society buys into it.

The veil is a juxtaposition of this crazed, cookie-cutter wedding planning, and the very personal, sacred event. The "fabric" of the veil is marked with direct quotes from people's wedding experiences and passages from Gibran's The Prophet and from the Bible. The use of refuse, industrial materials, along with precious metals and gems, symbolizes how we can reinvent our Everyday into sacred Breathtaking Moments.

Lionize II
Lionize II, close-up

Lionize II
From the Patent Pending Collection, collar 2006

Words on Lionize II collar:     ©     ®     ™     patent pending     jewelry isn't art Art     sell out     nobody will wear     i'm a freak     uncomfortable     who will buy?     too Gallery     too futuristic

Lionize--"to treat as an object of great interest or importance; to treat as celebrity."
Welcome to a world where your product's chance for fame is only a celebrity away! Just flip through the glossy pages of Instyle or Lucky and see for yourself what the power of a celebrity can do for your success as a designer. Got a necklace that is ridiculously tight and uncomfortable—no problem—just get a shot of Beyoncé or Angelina Jolie wearing it and you're golden. And don't forget to get a trademark for your creation to prevent others from being inspired by your work.

Showroom 007 & Pioneer a movement

Showroom 007 & Pioneer a movement
From the Patent Pending Collection, set of cuffs 1999

Words found on cuffs:

Showroom 007 cuff:     jewelry isn't Art     sell out     nobody will wear     i'm a freak     uncomfortable     who will buy?     too Gallery     too futuristic

Pioneer a movement cuff:     jewelry isn't Art     envogue     mass market     be responsible     bread&butter     knockoff     markdown     SALE!     hip&trendy     commercial
Made in Indonesia     pioneer a movement     hot item     fashion     everyone's wearing     don't listen

Lionize

Lionize
From the Patent Pending Collection, collar 1999

Words found on collar:

Lionize collar:     ©     ®     ™     patent pending

"The mistake everyone makes is in thinking that jewelry is art and it ISN'T." buyer, NYC showroom, 8/99

Our culture blindly compartmentalizes jewelry by its price tag: higher prices=Art; lower prices=Fashion Trend. Mind-expanding objects (i.e. art) are not immediately profitable, and are therefore not as accessible to the public. Rather, profit margin and mass appeal validates "quality" design as do brand names, Hollywood, and © or patent marks. Individualist thinking is discouraged—we are programmed to only buy into what is "hot this season".

The Queen MargheritaThe Queen Margherita
The Queen MargheritaThe Queen Margherita
The Queen Margherita

The Queen Margherita
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2007

This neckpiece is a modern-day reinterpretation of The Royal emerald, pearl and diamond necklace of Queen Margherita, consort of King Umberto I of Italy during the 1870s. For her love of jewelry and pearls, she was known as "The Queen of Pearls," the necklace being part of her dowry, originally in the dowry of her mother, Elizabeth of Saxony, the daughter of King John of Saxony. During the 20th century many of the royal jewels were unmounted and reset (the necklace included), and redesigned so that large neckpieces could convert into bracelets, brooches, and smaller necklaces, akin to what was happening in French jewelry at that time.

In the spirit of Queen Margherita's jewels comes this similar "transformer"-like tribute, repurposed from a child's LEGO® set, hence making it the debut neckpiece in My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection. For you can never be too young to start your own jewelry collection, especially if it's made from LEGO®, the gold of children young and old!

Snow White
Snow White, close-up

Snow White
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2007

 

 

TictactoeTictactoe

Tictactoe
Necklace 2008

 

 

The Duchess
The Duchess
The Duchess
The Duchess

The Duchess
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

My First Royal Jewels, "The Duchess" neckpiece is a modern-day reinterpretation of a gold, turquoise, amethyst and diamond bib necklace, by Cartier, Paris, 1947. Given to Duchess of Windsor from the Duke, it was but one of many royal pieces that he had commissioned for his bride by the great houses of the day-Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Harry Winston. As with much royal jewelry, that neckpiece was designed around stones that had once been in other pieces. Both the Duke and Duchess worked closely with these design houses to create an astounding collection that spoke of their love and that showcased the exotic jewels they collected over their travels.

In the spirit of the Windsor's jewels comes this similar "recycled" tribute, repurposed from children's LEGO®, the second in the series, My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection. For you can never be too young to start your own jewelry collection, especially if it's made from LEGO®, the gold of children young and old!

The Duchess 2Windsor Cartier
The Duchess 2
The Duchess 2

The Duchess 2
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

"My First Royal Jewels" Jewellery Collection is a modern-day reinterpretation of jewellery created by some of the great design houses of the 20th century—Louis Boucheron (Paris), Cartier (Paris), and Harry Winston (USA)—much sought after names by the royal and social elite. In many instances, gemstones passed down through the generations (or across oceans) were remounted from their original designs into new works or as multiple pieces. For instance, a necklace could be redesigned to convert into a pendant and bracelet. This collection speaks to that spirit of transformation, as it is made from repurposed LEGO® sets, also handed down by family and friends.

Once upon a time, opulent jewellery was a telltale sign of aristocratic birth. After WWI, a European woman's jewellery was seen as emblems of her "lord's" rank in the world. Jewellery became a public symbol of financial success. Now we might ask the question: who are today's jewellery collectors and what is considered valuable and precious in the 21st century?

"My First Royal Jewels" Jewellery Collection invites people of all ages to contemplate this question by stepping into a collector's shoes and trying on the work as if it was their own. Your collection may become your family heirloom-more often than not, collections survive their owners. As value is often informed by nostalgia, the child in you may find just as much preciousness in these repurposed, LEGO® constructed designs as ones made with gemstones and platinum.

Cartier Blanc
Cartier Blanc
Cartier Blanc
Cartier 1922

Cartier Blanc
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

"My First Royal Jewels" Jewellery Collection is a modern-day reinterpretation of jewellery created by some of the great design houses of the 20th century—Louis Boucheron (Paris), Cartier (Paris), and Harry Winston (USA)—much sought after names by the royal and social elite. In many instances, gemstones passed down through the generations (or across oceans) were remounted from their original designs into new works or as multiple pieces. For instance, a necklace could be redesigned to convert into a pendant and bracelet. This collection speaks to that spirit of transformation, as it is made from repurposed LEGO® sets, also handed down by family and friends.

Once upon a time, opulent jewellery was a telltale sign of aristocratic birth. After WWI, a European woman's jewellery was seen as emblems of her "lord's" rank in the world. Jewellery became a public symbol of financial success. Now we might ask the question: who are today's jewellery collectors and what is considered valuable and precious in the 21st century?

"My First Royal Jewels" Jewellery Collection invites people of all ages to contemplate this question by stepping into a collector's shoes and trying on the work as if it was their own. Your collection may become your family heirloom-more often than not, collections survive their owners. As value is often informed by nostalgia, the child in you may find just as much preciousness in these repurposed, LEGO® constructed designs as ones made with gemstones and platinum.

Maharajah's 6thBoucheron
Maharajah's 6th
Maharajah's 6th

Maharajah's 6th
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

"My First Royal Jewels" Jewellery Collection is a modern-day reinterpretation of jewellery created by some of the great design houses of the 20th century—Louis Boucheron (Paris), Cartier (Paris), and Harry Winston (USA)—much sought after names by the royal and social elite. In many instances, gemstones passed down through the generations (or across oceans) were remounted from their original designs into new works or as multiple pieces. For instance, a necklace could be redesigned to convert into a pendant and bracelet. This collection speaks to that spirit of transformation, as it is made from repurposed LEGO® sets, also handed down by family and friends.

Once upon a time, opulent jewellery was a telltale sign of aristocratic birth. After WWI, a European woman's jewellery was seen as emblems of her "lord's" rank in the world. Jewellery became a public symbol of financial success. Now we might ask the question: who are today's jewellery collectors and what is considered valuable and precious in the 21st century?

"My First Royal Jewels" Jewellery Collection invites people of all ages to contemplate this question by stepping into a collector's shoes and trying on the work as if it was their own. Your collection may become your family heirloom-more often than not, collections survive their owners. As value is often informed by nostalgia, the child in you may find just as much preciousness in these repurposed, LEGO® constructed designs as ones made with gemstones and platinum.

Dia de los Muertos de Westwood
Dia de los Muertos de Westwood

Dia de los Muertos de Westwood

The Dia de los Muertos de Westwood necklace collage was made for Ethical Metalsmiths' Radical Jewelry Makeover Project (RJM) from unwanted jewelry donated by the San Francisco Bay area community. It is inspired by Day of the Dead imagery and Vivienne Westwood's elaborate jewelry pieces from repurposed costume jewelry.

RJM is an environmental awareness project that takes place annually at different cities across the US. It involves teams of volunteer jewelers and metalsmiths working at schools and studios in several different locations to reconstruct and transform jewelry donations into exciting new jewelry designs. In 2008, RJM was held in the greater San Francisco area. The handmade 100% recycled jewelry was showcased in an exhibition at Velvet da Vinci gallery, with sales benefiting Ethical Metalsmiths' efforts to educate and connect people with responsibly sourced materials.

Population Control 2.0
Population Control 2.0
Population Control 2.0

Population Control 2.0

Population Control 2.0 is a piece from a larger body of work titled, Jewelry_cycle, a project by the Metal Arts Critique Collective. As a member of the collective, we were all invited to make a wearable artwork using found circuit board material that was provided by one of the members. Population Control can be seen as a modern-day form of male birth control. In 2004, the Department of Urology at State University of NY at Stony Brook published a study on the effects of continual laptop use linked to increase in scrotal temperatures. The study raised alarm in the tech sector as a possible cause of male infertility. So not only is the production of computers toxic to our environment, its use may potentially effect our ability to populate future generations.

Blue SteelBoucheron
Blue Steel
Blue Steel

Blue Steel

It was said of René Lalique that "he sought to find some expression for his own time and for all the knowledge which from the past as a legacy remained to him," for "the designer must be going forward, not toward novelty, but towards a close and more genuine knowledge of what is really of himself and of his time."

In this spirit of future forward design, Cygne Noir is a 21st century take on Lalique's infamous enamel Necklace with Insect Women and Black Swans, first shown at the 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle. Considered on of his best works, it depicts his fascination with the darker symbols of Art Nouveau.

Cygne NoirLalique
Cygne Noir
Cygne Noir

Cygne Noir

Based on Maison Boucheron's blue steel, diamond, and pearl necklace of 1890. At that time, Louis Boucheron created jewelry in the historistic style, this piece influenced by the early 1700s French Régence. At the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, it was said of Maison Boucheron, "although belonging to the old school of jewelry," was singled out not only for its "respect for diamonds," but also for its "modernist vision."

Encrypted
Encrypted
Encrypted
Encrypted
Encrypted
Encrypted
Encrypted

Encrypted

Made to accompany "Coffer with Key, German, Iron w. walnut base, 1650"

Computers are the "coffers" of the 21st century. They hold everything personal such as family photos, finances, and work projects stored for prosperity inside a hard drive. They serve as our portal to the outside world where we conduct "secure" business with others via encrypted systems and passwords. Private data can shared securely with others electronically via "keys" which lock (encrypt) and unlock data. While someone can physically steal a computer, they cannot gain access to the treasures within as long as the system has been Encrypted.

The computer components and circuitry in Encrypted were compiled from abandoned and damaged computers found in the street or donated by friends. Created as a companion piece to an iron German Coffer (1650) from the National Ornamental Metal Museum's Permanent Collection. The decorative quality of the iron coffer's internal lid locking mechanisms informed the design of the three brooches; the coffer's wood base inspired the layered wall environment for the brooches to rest.

dawningLouise Nevelson's Dawn's Wedding Feast
dawning
dawning

dawning

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...

dawning IIdawning II
dawning II

dawning

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...

Winter's BrushThe Russian Bride's Attire
Winter's Brush

Winter's Brush

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet...

PortraitPortrait Lady
Portrait

Portrait

The Musée Series is a series of hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind art jewelry pieces inspired by visits to the San Francisco Fine Arts Museums, of the works in their permanent collections as well as special curated exhibitions. My intent being to create a modern day context for Old Masters works and reinterpret bodies of work by modern artists as a reflection of our 21st century society and what is considered valuable. My use of repurposed LEGO® as a material is deliberate as it makes an intimate connection with all generations worldwide, from child to adult to grandparent. Everyone brings to my pieces their own story, and with it nostaglia for these infamous plastic bricks which are often regarded much like the "family jewels", being passed down from generation to generation.

Specifically, "Portrait" neckpiece is inspired by the silhouettes, colors and hand-carved ivory frame from "Portrait of a Lady", 1591, oil on panel with hand-carved ivory frame by Flemish artist Frans Pourbus the Younger.

La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory)La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory)
La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory), pendant
La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory), pendant

La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory)

Inspired by Cartier's Ceremonial necklace commissioned by Maharajah Sir Bhupindra Singh of Patiala,1928. Over time, the necklace had disappeared and was rediscovered in 1998, missing the original central stones, including the infamous yellow De Beers center diamond. Cartier took it upon himself to recreate/restore the necklace to it's previous glory, using synthetic stones as place holders in hopes that the original stones will eventually be found.

La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen)La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen)
La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen)
La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen)

La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen)

Inspired by La Peregrina ("The Pilgrim") pearl, the most perfect natural pearl in the world, discovered by an African slave at Pearls Island, who exchanged it for his freedom, bringing it into the hands of Spanish royalty. Earning its name as "The Pilgrim", it was passed back and forth between Spain, England, and France for centuries, many as wedding gifts to queens, until it was purchased by Richard Burton for Elizabeth Taylor in 1969. Together with Cartier they designed it's current form, suspended as a detachable pearl pendant from a larger diamond, ruby, pearl, platinum and gold necklace. Jewelry often told the story of Elizabeth and Richard's tumultuous love affair, and La Peregrina was no exception. When Elizabeth passed away, her jewelry went to Christie's Auction for Aids benefit, and La Peregrina was purchased for 3 times its starting bid price, for a whopping 11.8 million dollars.

photo credit: Kingmond Young
photo credit: Hap Sakwa
photo credit: George Post
photo credit: artist
photo credit: Christine Dhein
photo credit: Aura O'Brien
Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong, close-up
Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong, close-up
in the red: fashion*craft*art, close-up
 
Truth 2: The Past, close-up
Truth 2: The Past, close-up
Truth 2: The Present, close-up
Truth3: Mediacracy—Sold! To the Highest Bidder!, close-up
Truth4: The Past is Present—Violations of the IV, close-up
 
 
Lionize II, close-up
 
 
The Queen Margherita close-up
The Queen Margherita close-up
Snow White, close-up
 
The Duchess close-up
The Duchess close-up
Cartier 1947
The Duchess 2, close-up
The Duchess 2, close-up
Cartier Blanc, close-up
Cartier Blanc, close-up
Cartier 1922
Maharajah's 6th, close-up
Maharajah's 6th, close-up
Dia de los Muertos de Westwood, close-up
Population Control 2.0, close-up
Population Control 2.0, close-up
Blue Steel, close-up
Blue Steel, close-up
Cygne Noir, close-up
Cygne Noir, close-up
Encrypted, close-up
Encrypted, close-up
Encrypted, close-up
Encrypted, close-up
Encrypted, close-up
Encrypted, close-up
dawning, close-up
dawning, model
dawning II, close-up
Winter's Brush, model
Portrait, close-up
La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory), pendant
La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory), pendant
La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen), close-up
Cartier's La Peregrina necklace

Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong    artist's statement
thong sculpture 2005

recycled Plexiglas, fine & sterling & silver, copper wire, rubber [11"H x 14.5"W x 1/25"D]

photo credit: Kingmond Young

in the red: fashion*craft*art    artist's statement
craft tiara 2006

tiara: recycled glass, acrylic, sterling silver, resin, transparency film, rubies & sapphires, synthetic ruby corundum set in 14k gold [4.25" L x 4 7/8" W x 1 7/8" D]

tiara stand: recycled acrylic, fine & sterling silver [1.25" L x 2" W x 2" D]

photo credit: Hap Sakwa

Truth1: Infotainment    artist's statement
from the Truth series, neckpiece and frame 2002

neckpiece: recycled acrylic, fine and sterling silver, plastic [11.5"H x 9.5"W x 3.25"D]

frame: acrylic and sterling silver [19"H x 18"W x 1 1/8"D]

photo credit: Hap Sakwa

Truth 2: The Past    artist's statement
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

recycled: plexiglass, wood, plastic film; sterling silver [24.75"L x 13.75"H x 2.25"D]

Private Collection. photo credit: Hap Sakwa

Truth 2: The Present    artist's statement
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

recycled: plexiglass, plastic film, electronics; sterling silver [16.5"L x 11.5"H x 3.75"D]

photo credit: George Post

Truth3: Mediacracy—Sold! To the Highest Bidder!    artist's statement
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

brass, sterling & fine silver [27"L x 23"H x 3.25"D]

Private Collection. photo credit: George Post

Truth4: The Past is Present—Violations of the IV    artist's statement
From the State of Liberty Series, crown 2003

recycled: plexiglass, soil from Manzanar, wood, plastic film; sterling & fine silver; steel [31"L x 18.25"H x 3"D]

photo credit: George Post

in the red Bay: the Arts    artist's statement
neckpiece 2001

recycled glass, resin, sterling silver, transparencies [11"L x 7"W x 0.75"H]

photo credit: Hap Sakwa

"with these words I thee…"    artist's statement
bridal veil and tiara on platform 2001

veil: recycled plastic & acetate, pearls,crystals, glass [42"L x 12"W x 70"H]

tiara: sterling silver & recycled steel, pearls [6"L x 6"W x 4"H]

cake platform: wood, recycled plastic, silver foil brass handles [20"L x 20"W x 7"H]

photo credit: George Post

Lionize II    artist's statement
From the Patent Pending Collection, collar 2006

recycled plastic & acetate, sterling & fine silver, 18k gold, synthetic ruby corundum and cubic zirconias set in 14k gold [14.5"L x 4"H x 2.25"D]

Showroom 007 & Pioneer a movement    artist's statement
From the Patent Pending Collection, set of cuffs 1999

recycled plastic, transparencies, steel, rubber, sterling silver [3.5"diam x 2.5"ht & 4"diam x 3"ht]

Lionize    artist's statement
From the Patent Pending Collection, collar 1999

recycled plastic & acetate, steel mesh, sterling silver
[16"L x 4"H x 2"D]. Private Collection

The Queen Margherita    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2007

Show neckpiece converts into 3 bracelets, 2 neckpieces, one brooch.

Used & new LEGO®, coated copper wire, rubber cording, sterling silver, steel pin back.
[34" L open, 19.75" closed x 5/8-8.5" W x 0.5-1.75" D]
Museum of Contemporary Craft Teaching Collection

photo credit: artist & Christine Dhein

Snow White
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2007

Neckpiece converts into 2 bracelets.

Used & new LEGO®, coated copper wire, rubber cording, cubic zirconia set in 14k gold, sterling silver. [16" L open x 5/8-1.25" W x 0.5-7/85" D]

Tictactoe
Necklace 2008

Necklace made from recycled wood and repurposed sterling silver components; sterling & fine silver. [13.5" L x 9.75" W x 0.75" D]

The Duchess    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

neckpiece: Used & new LEGO®, rubber cording. [10.5" L closed x 9.75" W x 2.5" D]
(inspired by Cartier, Paris, amethyst, turquoise, gold, bib necklace, 1947)
Private Collection

photo credit: artist & Christine Dhein

The Duchess 2    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, rubber cord, sterling silver.
(inspired by Cartier emerald, diamond, and platinum necklace, 1960 and Harry Winston emerald, diamond, and platinum pendant, 1960)
This necklace can convert into a smaller necklace and a pendant. The large center "gem" becomes a pendant.

Cartier Blanc    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, rubber cord, sterling silver.
(inspired by Cartier, Paris, ruby, diamond, and platinum necklace, 1922)
Private Collection

Maharajah's 6th    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2008

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, rubber cord, sterling silver.
(inspired by Boucheron emerald, diamond, and platinum necklace, 1928)
Private Collection

Dia de los Muertos de Westwood    artist's statement
necklace collage 2008

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, rubber cord, sterling silver.
Private Collection

Population Control 2.0    artist's statement
boxer briefs 2008

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, rubber cord, sterling silver.

photo credit: Christine Dhein (model image)

Blue Steel    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2009

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO® and elastic, sterling silver. [14.5" L x 14.5" W x 2" D]
(inspired by Boucheron, Paris. Blue-tinted steel, diamonds, zircons, pearls necklace by Maison Boucheron. 1890.)

Cygne Noir    artist's statement
from My First Royal Jewels Jewellery Collection 2009

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, rubber cord, sterling silver. [24" L x 5" W x 3.5" D]
(inspired by René Lalique necklace. Necklace with Insect Women and Black Swans, 1900. Chased gold, enamel on gold, plique-a-jour enamel, Australian opal, Siberian amethyst. diameter 24.1cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, Gift of Lillian Nassau, 1985. from French Jewelry.)

Encrypted    artist's statement

set of 3 "Key" brooches on a wall environment 2009
recycled: circuit boards, computer parts, Plexiglas; sterling/fine silver, brass, gold, aluminum, steel
17 5/8"L x 7 1/4"W x 3"D (wall environment with brooches mounted)
11"L (including tail) x 4 3/8"W x 7/8"D (Key 1 brooch)
5 1/8"L x 2 1/4"W x 1 1/2"D (Key 2 brooch)
3 3/4"L x 2"W x 1"D (Key 3 brooch)

dawning
from the Musée Series 2010

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO®, silk cord, coated copper wire, fine silver label
[12" L (off body) x 7/8-2.5" W x 1/2-2" D; 5 3/8" L front center piece, 20.75" L (opened)]
(Inspired by Louise Nevelson's Dawn's Wedding Feast installation, 1959)
Private Collection

dawning II
from the Musée Series 2010

neckpiece: repurposed LEGO® and Connectix, recycled electronics cable, paint, sterling & fine silver
[17" L x 9" W x 4" D]
(Inspired by Louise Nevelson's Dawn's Wedding Feast installation, 1959)

Winter's Brush
from the Musée Series 2011

neckpiece: repurposed makeup brushes, LEGO®, silk cord, coated copper wire, fine & sterling silver, recycled rope cording [15.5" L x 15" W x 3" D]
(Inspired by Konstantin Makovsky (Russian, 1839-1915), The Russian Bride's Attire, 1889. Oil on canvas, 110 x 147 inches. Collection of Legion of Honor, SF.)

photo credit: artist & Aura O'Brien

Portrait    artist's statement
from the Musée Series 2012

show neckpiece: repurposed LEGO® and recycled laminate, steel wire, sterling silver
full necklace (inches): 20.5"L x 12"W x 3.5"D; center section: 12.25"L x 5.125"W x 3.5"D
full necklace (cm): 52.07L x 30.48W x 8.89D
(Inspired by Portrait of a Lady, 1591 (oil on panel with hand-carved ebony frame), by Frans Pourbus the Younger (Flemish, 1569-1622). Fine Arts Museums, San Francisco.)

La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory) artist's statement
from Les Voyageurs de Temps Series 2013

Convertible neckpiece: recycled and repurposed LEGO®, Argentium and sterling silver, fine silver tag
Full neckpiece: 21 1/4"L x 9 1/8"W x 2 1/8"D
Detachable lower Large pendant: 6"L x 4 3/8"W x 2"D
(Inspired by Cartier's Ceremonial necklace commissioned by Maharajah Sir Bhupindra Singh of Patiala,1928. Cartier Innovation Through the 20th Century, The Moscow Kremlin Museums, 2007)

La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen) artist's statement
from Les Voyageurs de Temps Series 2013

Convertible neckpiece: recycled and repurposed LEGO®, Argentium and sterling silver, fine silver tag, coated steel wire, 18" 4mm sterling silver cable necklace (for wearing individual lower pendants)
Full neckpiece: 18 1/2" "L x 8 1/2"W x 2 1/8"D
(Inspired by: Cartier's La Peregrina necklace, "the most perfect pearl in the world", commissioned by Elizabeth Taylor, 1972. Natural pearl, diamonds, rubies, cultured pearl, platinum, gold.)

La Reine de Pèlerin (The Pilgrim Queen) La Cérémonie de la Mémoire (The Ceremony of Memory) Portrait Winter's Brush dawning dawning II Cygne Noir Blue Steel Maharajah's 6th Cartier Blanc The Duchess 2 The Duchess The Queen Margherita Snow White Dia de los Muertos de Westwood Encrypted Population Control 2.0 Tictactoe Cher the Love: Strong Enough thong in the red: fashion*craft*art Truth1: Infotainment Truth 2: The Past Truth 2: The Present Truth3: Mediacracy—Sold! To the Highest Bidder! Truth4: The Past is Present—Violations of the IV in the red Bay: the Arts "with these words I thee…" Lionize II Showroom 007 & Pioneer a movement Lionize
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